Telerik Products now easily available in India via India Distributor

Diwali has just passed and the festivities are dialling down. Diwali has brought changes for Telerik in India and now I write this as an evangelist for Telerik/ Progress. In this blog post, I will list the changes and attempt to clarify if it has any impact on our community:

Telerik (a part of Progress) has changed its operations structurally in India. Indian Rupee billing was number one request from businesses who found USD billing to a US entity time taking and troublesome.

Telerik products will now be sold in India in Indian Rupees only via a distributor.While this does not affect you as a developer, your accounts team and business managers would love this change due to the following:

  1. A lot less hassle in making the payments done. Earlier, they had to get multiple forms (Form 15 CA & Form 15 CB) signed from a Chartered Accounts and make the payment via a wire transfer through the bank. This could take over 4-5 days to make a single payment and accrue additional charges for the wire transfer. Now, it is a simple NEFT or a UPI transfer.
  2. Lowering cost of projects to the customers. Earlier products like Telerik DevCraft couldn’t be used to offset indirect tax liability. With the new GST regime, your accounts team can offset the tax on their project lowering the cost of the implementation for their customers in India.

Isn’t this just great?

GTM final logo_512The new distributor is GTM Catalyst for the India market. What is even better is that I will be handling this new distributor organisation. This will bring the familiarity and continuity of business for you.

You may reach GTM Catalyst team for any questions or comments at: info@gtmcatalyst.com

To allay any questions in your mind, all the Telerik products continue to be available for sales and are fully supported by Telerik/ Progress. All products are moving full steam ahead including DevCraft, Kendo UI, Telerik Platform, Telerik Reporting, Sitefinity and Test Studio. Telerik (a Progress company) will continue to release new updates on a rigorous pace and continue to provide you with benefits of the latest technologies.

The latest webinar for R3 release for Telerik controls is now available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=10&v=sxv_7RnOwVI 

Lastly, we are eager to continue our India webinar series to share our learnings with you. We will be sending the webinar schedule to you shortly with an update here.

Remember to stay tuned here!

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How-To: Create Beautiful Charts with Kendo UI with Local Data

If you know jQuery, and want to include data-viz elements in your web page without all the hassle, you are at the right place. I am going to give you a gist of how Kendo works with jQuery to create robust data-viz elements.

We will build a ratings pie chart, step by step. Final product is shown below.

1. Download

First things first. You need to download Kendo UI. There are several paid versions, and a free (trial) version. Trial is more than enough for trying it out.

Download Kendo UI for a trial period from here. You will have to sign up to download it.

2. Transport

Extract the downloaded ZIP archive to an easily accessible location. We are going to need it’s js and css folders.

3. Kickstart

Kickstart the project by creating a new folder, say kendo-pie. Copy the downloaded js and css folders in kendo-pie.

Now, create a new HTML file in kendo-pie, say index.html. This is our main webpage. The pie chart will reside here.

4. The HTML

Open index.html with your favourite text editor. Add some starter code.

Give it a title, say Overall Ratings. Link all the necessary js and css files, inside head.

Time to populate the body. Create a wrapper (div), with id overall. The actual chart element and it’s script will reside in this wrapper. Create the chart div inside the wrapper, with id chart. Give it some style with a style attribute.

The above goes inside body, and the whole thing up-to this point looks something like this:

5. The jQuery

Create a script element inside the wrapper, and add some starter jQuery code.

Inside the document-ready function, select the chart element with jQuery’s id selector, and apply kendoChart() method.

6. The Kendo

kendoChart() takes a configuration object as an argument. This configuration object is used to describe the chart and include data (local or remote) to be represented.

Let’s contsruct the configuration object:

  1. Add title property.

2. Add legend property.

3. Add some defaults.

4. Add series properties: type of chart and local data.

5. Add tooltip property.

kendoChart() method is ready. So is the script. Coding part is complete. Wrapper should look like this.

These were the basic steps to create a pie chart using jQuery and Kendo, mostly Kendo. Now, open index.html in browser, and you should see output as below.

I hope the above steps were helpful in giving you a basic idea about Kendo UI. It’s up to you now to tweak the chart however you want, or create a new element altogether. There are loads available. Docs are available here, and demos here.

Note: This post is authored by Mr. Abhay Kumar, interning with GTM Catalyst (distributor of Telerik controls in India).

How-To: Connect Your Node.js App with SQL Server

Node.js is an exciting technology that has been widely adopted. For those starting out, one of the key requirements is the ability to connect node.js with an enterprise RDBMS such as MS SQL Server.

In this post, we will guide you through the process of connecting your Node.js app with SQL Server successfully, and hopefully, without any errors, doubts or confusions.

Let’s get started!

1. Download

Before getting started on the mission, we need a couple of things:

  1. SQL Server 2017 Express Edition* from here, and
  2. SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) 17.8* from here.

I am assuming you have Node.js installed on your PC.

*Version number might differ.

2. Install

Installation is easy. Double-click the SQL Server installer downloaded earlier, named something like SQLServer2017-SSEI-Expr*.

*Again, version number might differ.

Click Basic, then click Accept, and finally click Install.

After successful installation, you are greeted with a final screen containing information like Instance Name, SQL Administrators, Features Installed, Version, and also locations of various things including helpful Resources.

A row of four buttons is present at the bottom, containing: Connect Now, Customize, Install SSMS, and Close.

Close is pretty obvious, and we don’t need to touch Customize.

a. Connect Now

An instance of SQL Server starts running in the background automatically after successful installation (until you stop it manually).

The Connect Now button is a way to connect to that instance without any login. You can execute T-SQL statements right in the terminal.

Press the button, a new SQLCMD terminal window will open up. Terminal is all yours. T-SQL away!

b. Install SSMS

The Install SSMS button will take you to the same download page mentioned in Download above.

If you didn’t download SSMS earlier, now is the time. And then, just install it. Simple install, no worries.

3. Configure

OK! It’s time for some configurations:

  1. Enable TCP/IP to allow remote connections, and
  2. Enable default login or create a new one.

The default login in SQL Server is sa, stands for System Administrator (aka, sysadmin). It is disabled by default (I don’t know why). You need to enable it, or create a new sysadmin login for yourself.

1. Enable TCP/IP to Allow Remote Connections

Search in Start Menu for SQL Server Configuration Manager. Open it.

You can see that SQL Server (SQLEXPRESS) service is running, and it’s Start Mode is Automatic. Like I said earlier.

If you observe the left pane, you are in SQL Server Services section. Expand SQL Server Network Configuration, and click on Protocols for SQLEXPRESS. You can see TCP/IP is disabled by default. Right-click and Enable it.

Now, we need to set the default TCP port, which for SQL Server is 1433. Double-click on TCP/IP. Click on IP Addresses tab. Scroll down to the bottom to reach IPAII section. Clear TCP Dynamic Ports field and leave it empty. Set TCP Port to 1433. Click OK.

Restart SQL Server (SQLEXPRESS) service, and you are done with first configuration. Onto next one!

2. Enable Default Login or Create a New One

Search in Start Menu for SQL Server Management Studio. Open it.

You are greeted with a dialog box to connect to the server. You have to connect via Windows Authentication because you don’t have a sysadmin login right now to connect via SQL Server Authentication. Exactly the point of this configuration. Click Connect.

On the left, there is an Object Explorer pane. Here you can manage your server: creating and deleting logins, creating and deleting databases, and loads of other admin things, so to say.

Let’s enable the sa login. Expand Security. Expand Logins. You can see a little red cross on sa’s icon. This shows that the login is disabled.

Double-click sa. In the left pane, click Status. Select Enabled under Login in Settings. Click General in the left pane, change password, and click OK. Bam! You have a sysadmin login now.

You can try re-connecting to the server with this newly enabled login, or the one you create. Click File > Disconnect Object Explorer to disconnect. Click File > Connect Object Explorer…, this time, selecting SQL Server Authentication in the Authentication drop-down menu. Enter sa as Login, and the password you chose earlier as Password.

If you want to create a new login:

  1. Connect to server, if not already.
  2. Expand Security in the left pane.
  3. Right-click Logins.
  4. Select New Login…
  5. Enter Login name.
  6. Select SQL Server authentication.
  7. Enter and re-enter Password.
  8. Click Server Roles in the left pane.
  9. Select sysadmin.
  10. Click OK.

You have successfully configured your SQL Server.

Errors

Nobody wants errors. But sometimes, they are inevitable. You may encounter one of the two errors when you are trying to connect your Node.js app with SQL Server:

  1. ESOCKET: TCP/IP is disabled. Perform first configuration to get rid of this error.
  2. ELOGIN: Unable to login. Perform second configuration to get rid of this error.

4. Connect

Let’s create the simplest Node.js app, and connect it to SQL Server.

Create a new folder, say node-sql. Execute npm init in this folder to create package.json.

We need a Node.js driver for SQL Server. tedious is one such driver. Execute:

npm install tedious --save

Create a new index.js file (which will be the main entry point for our app) in node-sql. Open index.js with your favourite text editor.

‘Require’ required modules in the app.

const Connection = require('tedious').Connection;
const Request = require('tedious').Request;

Create a configuration object (config) to be used while connecting to the database.

const config = {
  userName: 'sa', // update
  password: 'your_password', // update
  server: 'localhost',
  options: {
      database: 'SampleDB' // update
  }
}

Use your preferred userName, password and database. Create new Connection object with the earlier created config object.

const connection = new Connection(config);

Try to connect to the database with newly created connection object.

connection.on('connect', function(err) {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
  } else {
    console.log('Connected');
  }
});

Your simplest Node.js app looks like this:

const Connection = require('tedious').Connection;
const Request = require('tedious').Request;

const config = {
  userName: 'sa', // update
  password: 'your_password', // update
  server: 'localhost',
  options: {
      database: 'SampleDB' // update
  }
}
const connection = new Connection(config);

connection.on('connect', function(err) {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
  } else {
    console.log('Connected');
  }
});

Execute:

node index.js

If you see this in console:

Connected

Congrats! You have successfully connected your Node.js app with SQL Server. If you are getting any errors, then refer the Errors section above.

I hope this article was helpful in giving you a quick overview of connecting your node.js application with MS SQL Server.

Note: This post is authored by Mr. Abhay Kumar, interning with GTM Catalyst (distributor of Telerik controls in India).

Angular + Kendo UI: DropDown Button

In our quest to beautifying the web, we present more “cool” UI available for the humble Kendo UI button.

The Kendo UI DropDownButton is a component that is available in {ButtonsModule} from
‘@progress/kendo-angular-buttons’.

For using Kendo UI buttons, you need to install Kendo in your Angular application. To learn the process of installation, follow my previous article and make your Angular app ready.


Power up your Angular 5 Application with Kendo UI

You need to complete the Angular v5 app along with Kendo UI Buttons module before continuing with the following:

DropDownButton looks like the Button but when you click, it displays a popup list with items. DropDownButton also allows us binding a list or an array with multiple values from an Angular component.

If you have any Array like this in any Component and want to show this array’s values as a list of options in the DropDownButton, you can do that using the following code.


data: Array<any> = [{

text: ‘My Profile’

}, { text: ‘Friend Requests’ },

text: ‘Account Settings’ },

text: ‘Support’ },

text: ‘Log Out’ }];

Now, in app.component.html, add a Kendo DropDownButton.
<kendo-dropdownbutton></kendo-dropdownbutton>

Kendo DropDownButton has a property called “data” for binding the Options list with it.

<kendo-dropdownbutton [data]=“data”>
User Settings
</kendo-dropdownbutton>

Now, your DropDownButton must be something like the below image and when you click on it, it shows all options:

Events Binding with DropDownButton

DropDownButton provides Events like:

  1. Focus
  2. Blur
  3. Open
  4. Close
  5. itemClick

Let’s have a look at how you can use any of these step by step:

Step 1. Create an Event Handler function in your Component Class.


public onItemClick (): void {

console.log (‘item click’);

}

Step 2. Use Angular Event Binding with your DropDownButton in component HTML file.

<kendo-dropdownbutton [data]=“data” (itemClick)=“onItemClick ()”>

User Settings

</kendo-dropdownbutton>

Step 3. Serve your Angular app in the browser and click on any available option in the DropDownButton.


In a similar way, you can use more events of DropDownButton, as in the following code:

(focus)=“onFocus()”

(blur)=“onBlur()”

(close)=“onClose()”

(open)=“onOpen()”

DropDownButton With Icon

To beatify your DropDownButton, use Icon along with Text using [icon] property of Kendo UI DropDownButton.
<kendo-dropdownbutton [data]=“data” [icon]=“‘gear'” (itemClick)=“onItemClick ()”>

User Settings


</kendo-dropdownbutton>

And it’ll be more attractive for your Client.



You can use other types of icons also like
FontAwsome or Image Icon, so as to make the buttons more eye-catching, For example:

  1. FontAwsome
    Just use the CSS of FontAwsome in your Angular App.

<link
rel=“stylesheet”
href=https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/font-awesome/4.5.0/css/font-awesome.min.css&#8221;>


<kendo-dropdownbutton [iconClass]=“iconClass”>

  1. Image Icon

Update the Component with Image URL in any variable, like:

imgIconURL:string=http://demos.telerik.com/kendo-ui/content/shared/icons/16/star.png&#8221;;

Now, use [imageUrl] in DropDownButton,

<kendo-dropdownbutton [data]=“data” [imageUrl]=“imgIconURL”>


Must checkout the
 built-in Kendo UI icons.

Popup Item Templates

This is really a best feature of DropDownButton. The Kendo UI DropDownButton provides options for setting the behavior of its popup and popup items with custom templates.

Step 1:

Add a new icon property and its value to your data array.
data: Array<any> = [{

text: ‘Cut’icon: ‘cut’ },

text: ‘Paste’icon: ‘paste’

}];

Now, use <ng-template></ng-template> for custom template and decorate it as you want.

<kendo-dropdownbutton [data]=“data”>
Edit

<ng-template
kendoDropDownButtonItemTemplate
let-dataItem>
<span
class=“k-icon k-i-{{ dataItem.icon }}”></span>
<span>{{ dataItem.text }}</span>
</ng-template>

</kendo-dropdownbutton>

Now, see the output. Well, it’s just awesome.


Data Binding with DropDownButton

The DropDownButton enables you to bind the data with DropDownButton in two ways:

  1. Primitive (strings and numbers).

    You can bind an array to the DropDownButton with string and numbers’ data called as Primitive, which we did in our previous examples.

data: Array<any> = [{

text: ‘Cut’

}, { text: ‘Paste’

}];

If the text field in the data objects is named text, the DropDownButton gets its value automatically.

  1. Complex (data inside objects) type.

A Complex data type is just an object with multiple properties. The component extracts the text value from the data items and in this way, sets the text of the items in the popup. If the name of the property in data source is different from the text—for example, actionText — you have to set it as a [textField]. Here is an example –
data: Array<any> = [{

actionName: ‘Undo’icon: ‘undo’ },

actionName: ‘Redo’icon: ‘redo’ },

actionName: ‘Cut’icon: ‘cut’ },

actionName: ‘Copy’icon: ‘copy’ },

actionName: ‘Paste’icon: ‘paste’

}];

Now, set [textField] to “‘actionName'”.

<kendo-dropdownbutton [data]=“data” [textField]=“‘actionName'”>

Edit

</kendo-dropdownbutton>

And Check the output:

We can add more properties like disabled, click, and more.

To set the enabled or disabled state of the DropDownButton, use disabled property. To set the icon of each item, use the icon, iconClass, and imageUrl properties of data items. To attach a function that will be called when the user clicks an item, set the click property of the data item.

  1. Disabled:

    Just add a new property “disabled: true” in the data object that you want to be Disabled. For example:

data: Array<any> = [{

actionName: ‘Undo’icon: ‘undo’ },

actionName: ‘Redo’icon: ‘redo’disabled: true },

actionName: ‘Cut’ icon: ‘cut’ },

actionName: ‘Copy’icon: ‘copy’ },

actionName: ‘Paste’icon: ‘paste’disabled: true

}];

Now, your output must be something like the below image.


  1. Click:

Using Click Property of Data Items in DropDownButton, you can attach a function. Let us see how it’s work.

First, add a click property to the data object array.

{

actionName: ‘Undo’,

icon: ‘undo’,

click: (dataItem) => {

console.log(`Undo in process !!`);

}

}

And, serve your Angular app again.


Keyboard Shortcut/Navigation

Kendo UI DropDownButton supports many shortcuts to make it more user-friendly from keyboard only. The keyboard navigation of the DropDownButton is enabled by default.

DropDownButton supports the following keyboard shortcuts:

SHORTCUT KEYS DESCRIPTION
Enter & Space Opens the popup, or activates the highlighted item and closes the popup.
Alt + Down Arrow Opens the popup.
Alt + Up Arrow Closes the popup.
Esc Closes the popup.
Up Arrow & Left Arrow Sets the focus on the previously available item.
Down Arrow & Right Arrow Sets the focus on the next available item.

Earlier articles on using Kendo UI with Angular:

ButtonGroup
Tell me more: Kendo UI ButtonGroup in Angular v5 App

 

How-To: SEO Friendly JS pages – Navigate Between App States With Kendo Router

In this post we learn how to make our Javascript pages SEO friendly.

With Javascript, we can render different content on the same URL. Search engines expect each URL to host unique content. This presents a dilemma for the search engine robots who see different content at different times for the same URL. This can lower the ranking of the page significantly. The solution is to have a unique link for each application “state”.

An interesting byproduct is that now each resource on your webpage gets its own URL to deeplink with.

The Kendo UI Router class is responsible for tracking and navigating between different states of application. It is very useful in making application states book-markable and linkable.

1. Kickstart

Instantiate a new router object with Router class.

const router = new kendo.Router();

Add default route handler, i.e. route handler for / route.

router.route('/', () => {
  console.log('/ URL was loaded');
  // Change state
});

Start router after document is ready (through jQuery).

$(() => {
  router.start();
});

The above code goes into the main logic of the app.


  const router = new kendo.Router();
  router.route('/', () => {
    console.log('/ URL was loaded');
    // Change state
  });
  $(() => {
    router.start();
  });

This was a very basic example of routing using Kendo Router.

2. Parameters

Parameters can be used in route handlers to handle a diversity of routes. Parameters are prefixed with a : (colon) to differentiate between hardcoded segments and parameter segments.

router.route('/api/:id', (id) => {
  console.log('id: ', id);
  // Change state
});

In the above example, id is a parameter. It’s value is passed to the callback function, and is used in the function to change app state, if required.

2a. Optional Segments

Optional segments can be used in URL to avoid 404 error in case of absence of parameter.

router.route('/api/:id/(:name)', (id, name) => {
  console.log('id: ', id, ', name:', name);
  // Change state
});

In the above example, name is an optional parameter. Both of the below URLs will invoke above route handler.

/api/1
/api/1/abc

2b. Globbing

Globbing means invoking route handler for every URL, in layman terms. It uses regular expression * to capture the whole URL after the *.

router.route('/api/*anything', (anything) => {
  console.log('anything: ', anything);
  // Change state
});

The above route handler gets invoked for anything after /api/. For example:

/api/123
/api/123/abc
/api/xyz123
and so on...

2c. Query String Parameters

In addition to route parameters, query string parameters can be used in routes. Route callback function receives a params object with query string parameters.

router.route('/api', (params) => {
  console.log(params.id, params.name);
  // Change state
});

The above route handler gets invoked with the following routes.

/api?id=2
/api?id=3&name=abc
and so on...

The parameters id and name can be accessed with the params object as params.id and params.name.

3. Navigate

The navigate method is used to navigate to a particular route and invoke its handler, and change the current state of app.

$(() => {
  router.start();
  router.navigate('/api');
});

The navigate method can be used only after starting the router. The above router.navigate(‘/api’) will invoke the respective route handler.

Missing Routes

What if a route is missing? We can handle missing routes by defining routeMissing method while creating the router object.

const router = new kendo.Router({ 
  routeMissing: (e) => { console.log(e.url); }
});

Note: This post is authored by Mr. Abhay Kumar, interning with GTM Catalyst (distributor of Telerik controls in India).

Getting Non-religious with React Library – Part I (The Concepts)

The Javascript wars are raging! Are you with the purist Javascript nerds or on traditional jQuery’s side or would you prefer lean React or does Google’s AngularJS get your mojo? This post isn’t about this religious debate.

This three part series is going to introduce the React to developers. React was created by Facebook and is supported by them.

We start slow in this post but will end with a working example of React application. We are interested in building an enterprise application and would end up adding a Grid to the page in Part III of this post.

The one thing I love about React is that it is non-religious. It is ready to embrace any JavaScript technology that you can throw at React. React is a very light weight framework and only contains the capability of rendering the view. React makes no assumptions about the rest of the technology stack used and can plug in with any Model or Model View framework.

Surprisingly with all that versatility, React is very simple to learn and can be introduced incrementally into an existing project (part running React and part running jQuery).

Here are some concepts to be aware about:

  1. Virtual DOM: Virtual DOM is a shadow of the page DOM but is never updated. It is only destroyed and re-rendered for the specific components that have changed. This makes updates blazingly fast.
  2. One Way Databinding: Closely tied to the above, only inputs are accepted as change of state. Change in the property doesn’t trigger the update on the DOM automatically.
  3. JSX: This is a JavaScript extension that allows XML to be embedded within React components directly. Think of this as a light weight template library.
  4. Classes/ Components: The heart of React. Everything rendered by React is a component. Components are composable and can be composed of additional components.
    1. Properties/ Props: React Components have properties that are used to accept input from other components and used to render the components directly.
    2. Events: Allows components to respond to various input activities.
    3. State: Components can maintain state that is only available to the specific component i.e. sort of a private data.
  5. References: One way binding constructs that allow inputs to be accessed from the backend.
  6. Developer Tools: React Developer Tools are available for Chrome and Firefox as a browser extension for React. It allows you to inspect the React component hierarchies in the virtual DOM.

React CLI

The easiest way to get started with React is through create-react-app CLI (the official React CLI). So, fire up your command line interface and get cracking..

First install the create-react-app:

npm install –g create-react-app

Then we can create a new app, and that bootstraps the entire application. We simply use “create-react-app my-app” and render it with npm start. Remember to browse to the root directory where you want to create your node application. I tend to keep my node projects in the “Documents\nodeprojects” directory.

create-react-app my-app

cd my-app

npm start

These commands just runs through a npm script to set up a server for us and kick off the app. You should see a screen as follows:

Note: It does take a while to install everything. Have patience as npm creates the first React app for you.

This was probably the fastest way to get started with node. In the next part, we will cover building a React application from scratch.

Tell me more: Kendo UI ButtonGroup in Angular v5 App

In our quest to beautify the web, we present more “cool” UI available for the plain & humble Kendo UI button. Kendo UI provides four types of buttons:

  1. Button
    You can use Kendo button in your application. To learn how, follow my previous article :
    Beautiful Buttons with Kendo UI in Angular v5 app
  2. ButtonGroup
  3. DropDownButton
  4. SplitButton

This post will cover the “ButtonGroup” control.

ButtonGroup

ButtonGroup is a collection of two or more Buttons.  Some features of this:

  1. Each button in the ButtonGroup can be separately configured depending on the requirements of your project.
  2. You can use any type of button in a ButtonGroup, like Button, Icon Button, or Image Button. Again, it depends on your project requirement.
  3. Kendo UI ButtonGroup also gives you selection modes. By default, it is Multi-selection with an option to change it into single mode.

For using Kendo UI buttons, you need to install Kendo in your Angular application. To learn the process of installation, follow my previous article and make your Angular app ready.

Power up your Angular 5 Application with Kendo UI

When ready with your Angular v5 app along with Kendo UI Buttons module, follow the following process.
Let us use three Kendo buttons in our app like this (output would be like the image):

kendoButton>Yes
kendoButton>No
kendoButton>Cancel

Now, if you need to use ButtonGroup, then write –


as Angular Directive for binding more than one buttons in a group.


kendoButton >Yes
kendoButton >No
kendoButton >Cancel

Now, serve your Angular app with “ng serve –open” again and see the difference in output:


This looks much better as a ButtonGroup.

If you select or click any button, it is not immediately visible  which button was selected. To include this important functionality, you can use toggable property of kendoButton and make it “true”:
[togglable]=“true”

The code now looks like the following:


kendoButton [togglable]=“true”>Yes
kendoButton [togglable]=“true”>No
kendoButton [togglable]=“true”>Cancel

Now, if you click any button in ButtonGroup, it’ll be in selected mode.

Icon buttons in ButtonGroup
Let’s further improve this by including an icon with the button. Here is an example of how you can use Icon button in ButtonGroup:


kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘check'”>Yes
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘cancel'”>No
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘close'”>Cancel

The result is much better with visual cues as follows: 

Here are some more icons available for Kendo UI Icon buttons.
https://www.telerik.com/kendo-angular-ui/components/styling/icons/#toc-actions


Kendo UI ButtonGroup Selection Mode:

Using Selection mode, you can restrict the number of buttons that can be selected in a ButtonGroup. By default, the selection mode of the ButtonGroup is set to multiple. If you want to select one at the time, set selection to single.
[selection]=“‘single'”

Use this code.
<kendo-buttongroup [selection]=“‘single'”>
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘check'”>Yes
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘cancel'”>No
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘close'”>Cancel


Again, serve your Angular App (ng serve –open). Now, user can select only one option at a time.

Disabled ButtonGroup

You can enable or disable the ButtonGroup or an individual button in a ButtonGroup for Angular App.

“disable” is a property for both, ButtonGroup or button. Set “disable” to “true” if you want to disable a ButtonGroup. By default, Kendo UI ButtonGroup sets it to “false” that’s why all the buttons in a group are enabled.

To disable a specific button, set its own disabled attribute to true and leave the disabled attribute of the ButtonGroup undefined. If you define the disabled attribute of the ButtonGroup, it will take precedence over the disabled attributes of the underlying buttons and they will be ignored.

[disabled]=“true”

Example:

Here are two ButtonGroups in which I used “disable” for ButtonGroup level and also for individual button.

<kendo-buttongroup [selection]=“‘single'” [disabled]=“true”>
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘check'”>Yes
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘cancel'”>No
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘close'”>Cancel



<kendo-buttongroup [selection]=“‘single'”>
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘check'”>Yes
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘cancel'” [disabled]=“true”>No

kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘close'”>Cancel


Watch the output:


Toggle Disabled

You can toggle “disabled” property at run time using component of Angular app. Edit your “app.component.ts” or any component code file where you want to write the function to toggle disable.

export
class AppComponent {

public isDisabled: boolean = true;

public toggleDisabled(): void {

this.isDisabled = !this.isDisabled;

}

}

Now, create a new kendoButton in the app where you want to bind this function.


<button
kendoButton (click)=“toggleDisabled()” [primary]=“true”>Toggle Disabled

And set [disabled]=isDisabledin HTML view. Like:


<kendo-buttongroup [selection]=“‘single'” [disabled]=“isDisabled”>

kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘check'”>Yes

kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘cancel'”>No

kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘close'”>Cancel




<kendo-buttongroup [selection]=“‘single'”>
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘check'”>Yes
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘cancel'” [disabled]=“isDisabled”>No
kendoButton [togglable]=“true” [icon]=“‘close'”>Cancel


<button
kendoButton (click)=“toggleDisabled()” [primary]=“true”>Toggle Disabled

Click on the button to Disable Toggle.

After clicking on “Toggle to Disabled”, your all disabled ButtonGroups or Buttons will be enabled.


Hope you enjoyed reading this article. Stay tuned for next one on “Kendo UI Dropdown Button”.

Beautiful Buttons with Kendo UI in Angular v5 app

You may have used CSS for styling your buttons. Here is an easy solution to make your application buttons more effective and user-friendly without the hassle of CSS, i.e., Kendo UI Buttons. These buttons provide a clickable UI functionality with arbitrary content.

For using Kendo UI buttons, you need to install Kendo in your Angular application. To learn the process of installation, follow my previous article and make your Angular app ready.

Power Up your Angular 5 Application with Kendo UI

Kendo provides four types of buttons:

  1. Button
  2. ButtonGroup
  3. DropDownButton
  4. SplitButton

Example:

To get all the package components, import the ‘ButtonsModule’ in your application root module, like in this code:

imports: [

BrowserModule,

FormsModule,

HttpModule,


// Register the modules

BrowserAnimationsModule,

ButtonsModule

]

The package also exports the following modules for individual components:

  • ButtonModule
  • ButtonGroupModule
  • DropDownButtonModule
  • SplitButtonModule

Button:

Button is an Angular directive which detects user interaction and triggers a corresponding event. In Kendo UI Button, we have some wonderful features:

  1. Default Button

For example, I need to use a button for selecting a file from my local computer, so I can use this button with only text (which is the default type), or with text and icon, or may be with only folder icon without text.

Then, select a button acording to your need :

  1. Only Text : <button
    kendoButton>Open</button>
  2. Text with Icon: <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘folder'”>Open</button>
  3. Only Icon: <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘folder'”></button>
  1. Bare Button

you just need to use [look] property of kendo UI Buttons and change it to ‘[look]=bare’.

Examples:

  1. Only Text : <button
    kendoButton [look]=“‘bare'”>Open</button>
  2. Text with Icon: <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘folder'” [look]=“‘bare'”>Open</button>
  3. Only Icon: <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘folder'” [look]=“‘bare'”></button>
  1. Flat Button

Again, just change the [look] property to ‘flat’ like ‘ [look]=”‘flat'” ‘. The bare and flat buttons look almost same but select or mouse hover styles are a little bit different.

Examples:

  1. Only Text : <button
    kendoButton [look]=“‘flat'”>Open</button>
  2. Text with Icon: <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘folder'” [look]=“‘flat'”>Open</button>
  3. Only Icon: <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘folder'” [look]=“‘flat'”></button>
  1. Outline Button

Outline Button is used to have a button with in-built border style. Change your [look] property to ‘outline’.

Examples:

  1. Only Text : <button
    kendoButton [look]=“‘outline'”>Open</button>
  2. Text with Icon: <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘folder'” [look]=” ‘outline'”>Open</button>
  3. Only Icon: <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘folder'” [look]=” ‘outline'”></button>

More Features and Functionalities of Kendo UI Buttons:

  • Disabled Button

To make any button Disabled, set the disabled property to true only.

Examples:

<button
kendoButton [disabled]=“true”>Save</button>

You can use the same property with any type of buttons.

  • Icon Button

You can create your buttons more user-friendly by adding image, predefined, or custom icons to it. The button provides three properties for it:

  1. icon: For using the built-in Kendo UI icons, Like Folder, Open Folder, and more.

    <button
    kendoButton [icon]=“‘calendar'”>Events</button>

  2. iconClass: Adding FontAwesome and other font icons from required third-party CSS classes, use iconClass property.

    CSS URL

    <link
    rel=“stylesheet”
    href=https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/font-awesome/4.5.0/css/font-awesome.min.css&#8221;>

    Using in Button

    <button
    kendoButton [iconClass]=“‘fa fa-calendar fa fw'”> Events</button>

  3. imageURL: for using third-party images as icon from a specified URL.

    <button
    kendoButton [imageUrl]=“‘https://demos.telerik.com/kendo-ui/content/shared/icons/sports/snowboarding.png'&#8221;>Snowboarding</button>

    Your buttons must be like this:

  • Primary Button

    The Button enables you to highlight the actions to the user by enhancing its appearance.

    For making any type of button as Primary, set the primary property to true. Like:

<button
kendoButton [primary]=“true”>Open</button>

And your output will be like:

  • Toggleable Button

    Toggleable Button enables you to indicate whether it is active or inactive. To get this behavior, use the togglable property and set it to true.

<button
kendoButton [look]=“‘bare'” [togglable]=“true”>Submit</button>

See the output when it’s in Inactive mode:

Active:

Manage Events of Kendo UI Buttons:

If you need to manage your events in Kendo Button, just write your event name in small brackets (), with event name, like if you need to use Click event then write like this:
(click)=“functionName ()”

Use the bellow code for button:

<button
kendoButton [primary]=“true” (click)=“testClick()”
>Click Me</button>

“testClick” its function Name replace this with your function, need to be call. Now create a function in “aap.component.ts”, like:

public testClick(): void {

alert(“Kendo Button Click Event is Working !!”);

}

Now run your app in browser, check the page:


Now click to test your click event.


Now you can use any Events Click, focus or more.

Is Blockchain right for your business?

The Government of India, in its 2018 budget, has undertaken to explore the use of blockchain proactively for ushering in a digital economy. It has also made clear the distinction between blockchain (that is supports) and Bitcoin cryptocurrency (that it doesn’t support).

When is the right time for your business to implement blockchain technology? Is it the right time to invest your capital in the technology and if yes, then will your current capacity or core capabilities be able to bear the overwhelming potential that blockchain has to offer?

But what is blockchain exactly?
And what capabilities make it so attractive for enterprises? Blockchain is a disruptive technology trend that enables a shared, authentic, decentralized ledger that is:

SECURE: Blockchain uses strong cryptography to create transactions that are impervious to fraud and establishes a shared truth. Also, all the transactions are signed with the digital certificate.

SHARED: The real benefits of blockchain, over conventional technology, are achieved when we use it to link organizations to share information on a distributed ledger.

DISTRIBUTED: A blockchain can be distributed across multiple organizations and becomes more secure as replicas are added.

LEDGER: Every transaction is written into the ledger once and cannot be changed after the fact.


What kind of businesses is blockchain best for?

First and foremost, blockchain technology is adept for businesses where large amounts of data is transferred, updated and filtered by multiple users. The potential scenario to apply blockchain depends largely on that. Once we realize that there is a situation that requires the capabilities of blockchain, there arises the need to understand whether a public blockchain is required or an enterprise blockchain is essential.

But what is an enterprise blockchain? An enterprise blockchain (i.e. Hyperlegder, Ethereum Enterprise, Ripple, Quorum, etc.) is a distributed ledger with the following characteristics:

  • All the participants, and their digital identities, are known from one or many trusted organizations
  • Writes and read permissions are roles-based and usually requires consensus of several participants
  • Multiple algorithms are used for consensus

There are two types of enterprise blockchain:

  • Private: Usually managed by a single organization. Typically, the network participants are internal business units or divisions.
  • Consortium: In this case, the blockchain network is managed by multiple trusted organizations. New participants require a consensus of several participants.

Which industries can use blockchain? The potential impact of blockchain is significant across all sectors and industries—from banking to government to healthcare and beyond, as it:

  • Eliminates intermediaries increasing efficiency and speed.
  • Simplifies operations by reducing cost and time related to reconciliations and disputes.
  • Potentially enables new business models increasing revenue and savings.

According to top market analysts and leading consulting firms, the top five industries that blockchain will likely disrupt by 2020 are
financial services, government, real estate, supply chain management, and media distribution. Currently, most active customers using blockchain are financial services institutions, including insurance companies. However, the trend is rapidly shifting to other industries.

More interestingly, a sizeable percentage of blockchain implementations involve at least one participant from a second industry such as manufacturing, government or retail. A few sample customer examples include:

  • Bank of America and Microsoft Treasury using Blockchain in a Trade Finance scenario to improve the process of issuing a Standby Letter of Credit to a customer (SBLC) to a customer.
    Impact: The process has been reduced from 3-5 weeks to just 3-5 days.
  • Renault Group is working together with Microsoft and VISEO to create the first digital car maintenance book based on Blockchain and using Microsoft Azure capabilities.
  • Large food manufacturers and distributors are using blockchain to track their premium products journey from source to consumption efficiently, and to have a shared ledger as the single source of truth.

An easy way to get started with Blockchain technologies in the cloud. Microsoft Azure is taken up as a use case here. Microsoft Azure Blockchain is the cloud platform for BankChain, a blockchain consortium of 30 top banks. Companies are creating innovative applications on top of Azure for near real-time cross-border remittance at near zero cost, real-time peer-to-peer transfer systems with automated reconciliation, end-to-end loan syndication process management, vendor onboarding, NDA processing, and vendor rating and many more. The State Bank of India, India’s largest bank is using Primechain’s blockchain-enabled smart contracts and KYC.

For enterprises, they can look forward to using cloud technology to test the waters with blockchain’s enterprise readiness. Currently, Microsoft Azure supports the most widely used blockchain and distributed ledger protocols on Azure, including HyperLedger Fabric, R3 Corda, Quorum, Chain Core and BlockApps.

Some principles that enterprises should look forward to are as follows:

  • Blockchain on your terms: No one-size-fits-all approach — The platform and the ecosystem partners should make it easy to get started and iterate quickly with the blockchain of your choice, both on-premises and in the cloud.
  • Integrated with your business: Merge blockchain with the IT assets you already have. The platform should let you integrate blockchain with the cloud services your organization uses to power shared processes.
  • Ready for the enterprise: With the Coco Framework, Cryptlets, and Azure services integrations, Microsoft is addressing existing technology gaps with blockchain and helps organizations build durable enterprise-grade applications.

Contact us at info@gtmcatalyst.com if you want to get started on this new and exciting journey!!

Power Up your Angular 5 Application with Kendo UI

Are you an Angular Developer? If yes so which CSS or SCSS you are using for making your application better in User Experience?

In this post, I’ll tell you how you can use Kendo UI by Telerik to make applications that pop out to users. We will use the minimalist approach in this article by simply “enhancing” a button on the webpage.

I’ve divided this article into three steps:

  1. Download Kendo UI for React, Angular, jQuery.
  2. Create an Angular Application by Angular CLI
  3. Include Kendo UI to showcase the improved User Experience

So, let’s start and see what is Kendo UI and how to get it?

What is Kendo UI?

Kendo UI is an easy to use HTML 5 JavaScript framework by Telerik for building interactive and high-performance modern web applications and websites. Kendo UI comes with JavaScript files, images and style sheets and offers a library of 70+ UI widgets and features. The best part is that Kendo UI provides AngularJS and Bootstrap integration.

To get Kendo UI, browse to:  https://www.telerik.com/kendo-ui and login if you have a Telerik account already or click to ‘Get a Free Trial’.

Now you need to select an option to indicate in which Application you want to use Kendo UI. I selected Angular because I’ll be creating an Angular 5 application.

Next you will need to create a telerik.com account. After the account is created, you will be shown a Getting Started document by Telerik Developers. This is a quick start guide that you can refer.

As the next step, we will create a vanilla Angular app in which we will install Kendo UI.

For Angular development, we need to have Angular CLI installed on our computer. We can check the same as follows:

  1. Open Command Prompt and type "ng -v" use to check angular version.

If we do not have angular installed, the command prompt will give an error. In this case,  please install Angular CLI, from the following URL: https://cli.angular.io/

Type the following command at Node command prompt or Command Prompt of windows: "npm install -g @angular/cli"

After successful installation of Angular CLI try again the last Command to check Angular Version "ng -v". I hope now you’ll get version info on command prompt.

Let’s create our first Angular App using CLI  by using the following command:
"ng new my-first-project –style=scss"

Now your Angular application is successfully created. But still we don’t have Kendo UI in our app.

To add Kendo UI in the Angular app, use the following command:

"npm install --save @progress/kendo-angular-buttons @progress/kendo-angular-l10n @angular/animations"

Note: The Kendo UI components use Angular animations. As of the Angular 4/5 release, you have to install the @angular/animations package separately.

Now you have Kendo buttons available in your Angular application.

We need to edit our project and I’ll be using Visual Studio Code by Microsoft for the same.

Open that folder where created your Angular application “my-first-project”.

Now you can see all files and folders of your project in your Visual studio Explorer. src is that folder where your application is existing.

As we know in Angular application we have a module file “src/app/app.module.ts” so update that file with following code:

import { BrowserModule } from ‘@angular/platform-browser’;

import { NgModule } from ‘@angular/core’;

import { FormsModule } from ‘@angular/forms’;

import { HttpModule } from ‘@angular/http’;

import { AppComponent } from ‘./app.component’;

// Import the Animations module

import { BrowserAnimationsModule } from ‘@angular/platform-browser/animations’;

// Import the ButtonsModule

import { ButtonsModule } from ‘@progress/kendo-angular-buttons’;

@NgModule({

declarations: [

AppComponent

],

imports: [

BrowserModule,

FormsModule,

HttpModule,
// Register the modules

BrowserAnimationsModule,

ButtonsModule

],

providers: [],

bootstrap: [AppComponent]

})

export
class AppModule { }

Your code should look like the below:

Now we will add an input button from Kendo UI. Update your view file from path ‘src/app/app.component.html’ with the following code:

{{title}}

kendoButton (click)=“onButtonClick()”

[primary]=“true”>My Kendo UI Button

The code should look like the following:

We are almost done. The last change is to include a function in your default component that can be called on button click which updates the model value.

Update your app component ‘src/app/app.component.ts ‘ as follows:

import { Component } from ‘@angular/core’;

@Component({

selector: ‘app-root’,

templateUrl: ‘./app.component.html’,

styleUrls: [‘./app.component.scss’]

})

export class AppComponent {

title = ‘Hello World!’;

onButtonClick() {
this.title = ‘Hello from Kendo UI!’;

}

}

It is time to run the application. Now open terminal or Command prompt to start your application.

For built-in terminal in Visual Studio code press (ctrl + `) and run command:

'ng serve' to start web pack for angular application.

Note: The Kendo UI components use @angular-devkit/core from node modules. If you get the error as shown:

Then you have to install the @angular-devkit/core package separately by using command:

'npm I @angular-devkit/core'

After this again run 'ng serve' or 'ng serve –open' it’ll start listening our request on a default port 4200 in windows. We can change it if this port is busy by using command: 'ng serve –port <1234>' 1234 is any free port.

So, here is your first look of your application with a simple and plain button.

Now install Kendo Default Theme for you scss in application with command:

'npm install --save @progress/kendo-theme-default'

It will update your packages in application.

Now just update last file of this project ‘src/styles.scss’ to import the Kendo Theme:

@import “~@progress/kendo-theme-default/scss/all”;

This is how easy it is to get Kendo UI in your Angular v5 app.

Just run your application again with same command: 'ng serve –open'

With the stylesheet in place, you should see something like this in the browser:

012018_1355_powerupyour25

Hope you have enjoyed this simple tutorial on Getting Started with Angular with Kendo UI. The source code for this simple application will be available shortly.

To explore the other features of Kendo UI button, please visit: https://www.telerik.com/kendo-angular-ui/components/buttons/button/

We will be publishing more such guides. Come back for more!

Getting Customers to Commit to your Mobile Application

The most obvious assumption on technology that is made by the product teams today is the need to be mobile first. A nice looking mobile app is built as the MVP in the spirit of mobile first. However, this mobile app fails to capture user attention. Familiar story?

There is a big realisation that I recently had while mentoring a startup that I am sharing here:

The goal of every business is to move customers to the Advocacy stage which enables a virtuous cycle to set in. This journey requires an important ingredient that is hard earned – Customer Commitment.

Here is a simple question – if you knew that there is a one time service that requires you to:

  1. Download an app
  2. Create an account
  3. Then do your first task

Would you use that service? Probably too much for a single use, right?

However, if you knew that this service is likely going to be used repeatedly by you, there would be little hesitation in downloading and using a mobile application (think Facebook/ Whatsapp/ Mobile Banking).  You can see that customer commitment is directly indicated by the UI they use.

Most business applications are unlikely to have the virality of Facebook/ Whatsapp or the criticality of  a banking/ payment app. In these cases, UI customer’s choice is like a commitment they make to a service. The web interface requires the least resistance followed by a phone call and mobile app requiring the most commitment. There is an emerging capability that sits somewhere between  phone call and mobile app – bots running on other highly utilized platforms like Facebook Messenger, Telegram, Skype. Customer Continuum

The business would definitely want the customer to use its mobile app due to its sticky nature or the tonne of data it provides. The indirect assumption is that the customer is now at the Affinity/ Advocacy stage.

The user commitment needs to be gradually earned from least resistance UI by providing them value there and then moving them to the next level of UI. Business otherwise may have a tough time convincing a customer to directly download a mobile app.

If you are responsible for customer adoption, then think about this continuum and creating Aha moments with the website experiences itself. Graduate them to bot experience in the mobile app they are familiar with. Structure this bot experience to be more awarding for the customer. The heightened customer stickiness would result in the customer committing to your mobile application.

This approach would yield better commitment to your mobile app from your customers.

Jan/Feb Webinars Cancelled

Dear Users,

Due to unforeseen circumstances, we will be cancelling all webinar sessions for January and February until further notice. We apologize for the last minute change.

We’ll keep you posted on calendar schedule and resumption.

Regards,

Telerik/Progress India Team

Getting Starting with Rollbase Platform on-Premise

In this tutorial, we will go over install Rollbase Platform on your environment. In this post we focus on installing Rollbase on windows server environment for Single Server/non-high availability development use. Post will cover the following areas

  • overview and Features
  • install
  • Database Configuration
  • Startup and overview

Overview of Rollbase:

Progress Rollbase enables you to build all of your business applications in one place from the comfort of your Web browser while writing a minimum amount of code (typically 80% clicks, 20% code). Reduce your development time and resource requirements, accelerate your time-to-market, simplify application delivery and deployment, and provide a proven cloud platform on which to build all of your custom business applications. With Progress Rollbase, you are in complete control of your development.

Continue reading